• Demi Lovato Slays in a Bright Bandeau Bikini on a Boat in Vancouver

    What's so bad about being confident? Demi Lovato's latest bikini 'gram is proving there's absolutely nothing wrong with flaunting your bod. The "Confident" singer rocked a printed bandeau bikini top and matching high-waist bottoms with string detailing on the side, showing off a hint of skin on her hips. The 24-year-old struck a seductive pose on the railing of a boat, looking off into the idyllic blue water in the sexy snap. "I you Vancouver," she captioned the post on F

    InStyle
  • I Wrote About Giving Up a $95,000 Job to Move to an Island and Scoop Ice Cream. I Wasn't Prepared for the Response.

    I dismantled my life in New York and headed to a place where I knew no one.

    Cosmopolitan
  • Police Video Shows Woman Hearing About Shooting Death of Her Ex, an FSU Law Professor

    The ex-wife of slain Florida State University law professor Dan Markel told Tallahassee police on the day of the shooting that she was in fear and worried that whoever shot Markel could be coming for her children next. Markel was killed on the morning of July 18, 2014. A prominent professor with a national reputation for provocative legal scholarship, he was shot in the head just as he pulled his car into the garage of his Tallahassee home.

    Good Morning America
  • The Drive
  • Here's why you need to update your iPhone now, and how to do it

    If you're on an iPhone, there's something you need to know.

    CNBC
  • Kayla Mueller Part 5: Kayla's Sacrifice Allows Sex Slave to Escape

    Even after being raped by ISIS leader, Kayla foregoes her chance to run to save others.

    ABC News Videos
  • Trump Campaign Bombs in Virginia, Again

    PURCELLVILLE, Va. -- Mike Pence definitely chose the wrong place to give a stump speech. Trump's VP nominee railed against Hillary Clinton in northern Virginia Saturday afternoon -- but he chose to do it at an evangelical Christian college with a history of anti-Trump sentiment. Students protested outside, while inside students stood in silent protest until they were ejected mid-speech.   The protests and poor attendance at the speech at Patrick Henry College illustrate the challenges that Trump has appealing to evangelical Christians, especially younger ones, who are turned off by his tone, his campaign ideas and his personal history -- and are not at all assauged by his choice of Pence for

    The Daily Beast q
  • An airman left for dead, and a grainy hint of life

    Britt Slabinski could hear the bullets ricochet off the rocks in the darkness. It was the first firefight for his six-man reconnaissance unit from SEAL Team 6, and it was outnumbered, outgunned, and taking casualties on an Afghan mountaintop. A half-dozen feet or so to his right, John Chapman, a US Air Force technical sergeant acting as the unit’s radio man, lay wounded in the snow. Slabinski, a senior chief petty officer, could see through his night-vision goggles an aiming laser from Chapman’s rifle rising and falling with his breathing, a sign he was alive. Then another of the Americans was struck in a furious exchange of grenades and machine-gun fire, and the chief realized that his team

    BostonGlobe.com q
  • Dear Abby: Does rude wedding guest deserve thank you note?

    DEAR ABBY: During my wedding reception a month ago, one of the guests (a friend of my mom) poured a glass of water on the DJ’s laptop because he felt the music was too loud and he wanted it shut down. My husband was furious and asked the guest to leave. The incident was blamed on too much alcohol, and it ruined the rest of the evening. Many guests were upset and left. The man ended up paying the DJ to replace the laptop and sent us a note of apology for his behavior. My question is, must we send a thank-you note to him and his wife for the wedding gift they gave us? What the man did was unforgivable. In many ways he spoiled our day. Mom thinks I should “do the right thing” and thank them for

    Chicago Sun-Times q
  • Candyman III: Day of the Dead

    The Candyman returns intent on making his descendent join him forever. After he frames her for the murders of her friends, she has nowhere else to turn.

    AT&T q
  • Blogger's Experiment Proves How Important Makeup Is for Making Impressions

    This makeup blogger's personal experiment puts scientific results to the test and proves that, unfortunately, if you want to be liked, taken seriously, and set a good first impression, you should probably be wearing makeup.

    Devon Kelley
  • Dwyane Wade's Cousin Fatally Shot Pushing Baby Stroller in Chicago

    Nykea Aldridge was not the intended target, police said.

    ABC News q
  • Last days of the FARC (17 photos)

    Photography by John Vizcaino/Reuters, Story by Helen Murphy and Luis Jaime Acosta/Reuters After three decades fighting in the remote mountains of Colombia for a Marxist revolution, 60-year-old FARC rebel Cesar Gonzalez must now return to a society he barely recognizes. A peace deal unveiled on Wednesday between Colombia’s government and guerrilla leaders will end half a century of war and allow the rebels to set up a political party and seek power peacefully, at the ballot box. But reintegrating 7,000 fighters of the Revolutionary Armed Forces of Colombia (FARC) – many of whom have spent at least half their lives at war - will be a crucial part of making the peace deal work, and it is no easy task. “The world has changed so much – technology – we are out of date, but we must get up to speed,” said Gonzalez, who says he left his wife and their four children and took up arms to prevent being killed for his Communist beliefs in the 1980s and hasn’t seen them since. He knows little of iPhones, the Internet or even washing machines. “In those days telephones had dials,” he said, laughing at how out of touch he is with modern Colombia. Returning guerrilla groups to society at the end of civil wars is always difficult and the challenges are even bigger in Colombia because the conflict has gone on for so long. Gonzalez, who teaches Marxism at a FARC camp high in Colombia’s Cordillera Oriental, or Eastern Mountain Range, says he has no regrets about his guerrilla life and is preparing for a new life in community politics. Even for some younger rebels, like 33-year-old Gissella Mendoza, civilian life may be tough. Trained as a medic during her 20 years in the FARC’s ranks, she has saved lives, amputating limbs and stemming bleeding from major wounds. But it is unlikely she will be able to practice her field when she demobilizes. With only a fifth grade education, little money and most of her life hidden from society, she would need to start from scratch and learn alongside much more privileged students. “God willing, I’ll be able to continue, what else can I do?” she says, a 9 mm pistol strapped to her waist. “It would be so hard.” The rebels’ base is extremely remote, accessible only with a three-day journey by mule – fording furious rivers and climbing rock faces. The camp itself is a hodge podge of wooden structures that run along planks stretched across the mud. Fattened pigs loll at the entrance and blustering wind competes with the constant whir of a generator. FARC fighters here say they are optimistic a binding end to the war is possible but would not flinch at returning to armed struggle if the government shirks on its commitments to protect demobilizing rebels, allow the rebel group to enter politics and invest in rural areas. “If the government fails to meet its obligations, we will take up arms again,” said Gabriel Mendez, 32, an 18-year veteran who teaches peace accords to the rebels and worries they may be targeted by death squads. Fear of being killed is real. During a previous peace process in 1985 thousands of former FARC rebels and supporters were assassinated by paramilitary groups. A repeat of that violence seems unlikely now, but some guerrillas are wary. They know how to obtain weapons, and disarming as part of the accord would be easily reversible, said one rebel who asked that his name not be connected to such comments. Under the peace deal, the FARC committed to disarm, end its involvement in the illegal drugs trade and provide reparations to its victims. ‘DIABOLICAL’ For now, the rebels believe peace will hold and they will be able to compete for power at the ballot box. “Peace will allow us to talk; we want to talk,” said Leiber Ramires, 38, a soft-spoken rebel commander dressed in olive green fatigues and rubber boots. “Colombians have been sold a story that we’re diabolical – we aren’t and we want to form a political party that will allow us to fight alongside society.” The fighters listen in silence – except for the constant coughing – to Leiber’s lecture before standing in line for breakfast, then another class. The teachings seem archaic for a post-conflict Colombia and Latin America’s fourth-biggest economy. “We are revolutionaries,” said Ramires. When asked about their future, the rebels say they want to be involved in a political solution. They expect to live off funds from international aid. Few talk about government programs for reintegration or see any problem entering the work place after decades at arms. “We will await orders from our leaders, see what they tell us to do,” said 28-year-old female fighter Amalfi, her nom de guerre, who has been in the ranks since she was 17. The rebels patrol the valleys beyond the camp and cook rice, beans and pork in the kitchen’s clay oven. They bathe in ice-cold mountain water and sleep on frames of tree trunks filled with leaves. The forest provides privacy for their toilet needs. Food arrives at the camp by pack mules. Every month, sacks of potatoes, toiletries and other staples are strapped to the beasts which totter along slippery mountain paths. The FARC has for decades used proceeds from extortion and the illegal drugs trade to fund its war. “We have more than most Colombians, we have food,” said Amalfi, who wants to seek out her family as soon as possible. Women make up about 30 percent of the camp and while they carry the same weapons and wear the same uniforms as men, they also use colorful hair accessories and makeup. Permission is required from the camp’s commander for sex between fighters. The 51st front and the nearby 53rd, a two-hour hike on foot, form part of the FARC’s feared Eastern Bloc. Both have seen their fair share of war. When the FARC tried to seize the capital Bogota in 2001, rebels from here were stationed in surrounding towns until a hardline offensive spearheaded by then-President Alvaro Uribe pushed them back into the inhospitable mountains. They suffered nightly bombing raids that they remember as the worst time of the war. A bilateral ceasefire agreed in June means camp life is easier now. Smoking is permitted past 6 p.m. and torches guide the way along slippery walkways. The final accord, which still needs to be signed and put to voters in a referendum, will test the country’s tolerance. Both sides are suspicious of each other and many Colombians despise the FARC because of its involvement in drug trafficking and kidnappings. Without forgiveness, peace could fail and the nation return to war, says 29-year old Katerine Mendoza, who wears a necklace depicting the FARC’s late founder, Manuel Marulanda. “We were born civilians. We took up arms out of necessity and if the state isn’t careful we will return with pain in our souls,” she said. See more news-related photo galleries and follow us on Yahoo News Photo Tumblr

    Yahoo News Photo
  • Jennifer Aniston on the Health Issue That's Been Holding Her Back

    "I learned that I had been wrong all this time.​"​

    Marie Claire
  • You Should Never Ask For a Slice Of Lemon In Your Drink

    There’s something about summer that makes us want to put citrus into every single drink. Beer? A slice of orange. Cuba libra? Lemon. Mojito? Bring on the limes.

    Yahoo Beauty Staff
  • Mom Dies Trying to Rescue 2-Year-Old Son Who Fell in Lake, Officials Say

    The tragic accident happened this past Tuesday, when the mom had been boating with her family at Lake Powell in Glen Canyon National Recreation Area, according to a National Park Service (NPS) news release on the same day. At one point, the 2-year-old boy suddenly fell overboard, and his mother -- identified by family and friends as Chelsey Russell -- immediately jumped into the lake. Russell held her son above the water until her brother, who was in another boat, came by and pulled them out, the NPS said.

    Good Morning America
  • Texas Woman's University volleyball coach quits after 8 players hospitalized

    The volleyball coach at Texas Woman's University has stepped down in the wake of news that eight of her players had to be hospitalized for a muscular condition. The Denton Record-Chronicle reported that head coach Shelly Barberee submitted her resignation late Friday. The program has been under scrutiny recently after eight volleyball players were admitted last weekend for rhabdomyolysis, a breakdown of muscle tissue that releases potentially damaging proteins into the bloodstream. "Although the investigation remains underway, Texas Woman's University's initial belief is that overexertion coupled with dehydration during practices last week caused these student-athletes to experience rhabdomyolysis," said Monica Mendez-Grant, vice president for student life, in a statement published on the school's website.

    Dallas Morning News q
  • Amazon sends bizarre email in Chinese to suspended sellers

    Amazon sent marketplace sellers who had been suspended a weird email in Chinese telling them they'd been reinstated.

    CNBC.com q
  • Trump fights breaking out across college campuses

    Michael Straw, a senior at Penn State University, returned to campus this week, put on a crisp blue suit, and walked into a Trump buzzsaw. The president of the school’s chapter of College Republicans had a sense of what he was in for. Less than two weeks before, the group had announced in a Facebook post that they would not endorse Donald Trump after holding an online vote — a move that sparked outrage, including a call from the chairman of the Pennsylvania Federation of College Republicans for Straw to resign. Story Continued Below So when Straw gaveled in the chapter’s first meeting of the school year on Monday, it wasn’t altogether surprising that he was confronted by angry college Trump supporters

    POLITICO q
  • Saturday Night NFL Takeaways

    John Breech joins Matthew Coca with the biggest takeaways from Saturday night's NFL Preseason action.

    AT&T q
  • A woman describes what it's like to be abducted at 22 and spend 7 years as a slave with one of the most ruthless Mexican drug cartels

    Daniela remembers being driven blindfolded through the desert in northern Mexico, thinking she was going to her death. She recalls being told to get out of the van, uncover her eyes, and follow her armed captors into a large house and down into the cellar. She was obliged to watch what was going on, and tried to blank out her mind. It didn't work. She still remembers the scene — about five young women bound to pillars, surrounded by men who had paid a lot of money not just to rape them, but to torture and perhaps kill them as well. Daniela is not her real name. She insists on a pseudonym, because she may have escaped, but the reach of her former captors is long. What she saw that day was just

    Business Insider q
  • Usain Bolt Brought Up to 10 Women Back to His London Hotel Room

    It’s been an eventful month for Usain Bolt, who not only turned 30 and solidified his title as the fastest man in the world, but who also partied, made out, and possibly had sex with people who were not his longtime girlfriend while he was in Rio. PEOPLE now reports Bolt took his talents to London after the games, where he brought as many as 10 women back to his hotel room two nights this week. A source tells the magazine Bolt arrived at London’s Cirque le Soir nightclub around 1 a.m. Monday and “[continued] the party back at his hotel” with a group of club-goers.

    Cosmopolitan